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Sunday, July 5, 2015

Quite interesting for selfie lovers


MasterCard announced on Thursday that it's looking to add a layer of biometric security to its credit cards and all user will need to do is simply take a selfie. The system will create a digitized map of your face, convert that map into a hash and compare it to the hash stored on Mastercard's servers. Users will be able to pay through a mobile app with either their fingerprints or by staring into the device and blinking once. The blink is used to prevent someone from just holding up a picture of you to spoof the system. What's more, "They're storing an algorithm, not a picture of you," Phillip Dunkelberger, who runs Nok Nok Labs, told y. "And I'm sure they're doing the appropriate stuff to guard it."

How it works:
You have to download the MasterCard phone app to use the feature.
MasterCard said a pop-up will ask for your authorization after you pay for something
If you choose fingerprint, all it takes is a touch. If you go with facial recognition, you stare at the phone -- blink once -- and you're done. MasterCard's security researchers decided blinking is the best way to prevent a thief from just holding up a picture of you and fooling the system.
MasterCard said it doesn't actually get a picture of your finger or face. All fingerprint scans will create a code that stays on the device. The facial recognition scan will map out your face, convert it to 1s and 0s and transmit that over the Internet to MasterCard.
Bhalla promised that MasterCard won't be able to reconstruct your face -- and that the information would transmit securely and remain safe on the company's computer servers.
This makes some cybersecurity experts uncomfortable. They prefer that your data stay on your phone.
"I understand why they'd want that data, but no, I do not like it," said Robert M. Lee, co-founder of consulting firm Dragos Security. "From a privacy aspect it's awful -- but from a business perspective, I don't understand why they'd accept that risk."
Keeping this kind of information in one location makes it more tempting to hack. But there's some faith that MasterCard can adequately protect it.
"They're storing an algorithm, not a picture of you. And I'm sure they're doing the appropriate stuff to guard it," said Phillip Dunkelberger, who runs Nok Nok Labs, a company that creates technology that authenticates people.
MasterCard is only at the testing phase, company representatives noted. It might end up keeping facial scans on the device in the long run.
It doesn't end here. Bhalla said MasterCard is also experimenting with voice recognition, so you'll be able to simply approve an online transaction by speaking to your phone.
MasterCard is also working with a Canadian firm, Nymi, to develop technology that will approve transactions by recognizing your unique heartbeat. That means no interruptions.

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